Fight Medicare fraud & protect your identity

bIf you’re signed up for email updates from the Medicare Team You should read this one… All links will take you to the Medicare   website where you can find more information.

Happy National Consumer Protection Week! Now’s a great time to brush up on your Medicare rights and protections, and take action to protect your identity.

Identity theft: protect yourself

Identity theft is a serious crime that happens when someone uses your personal information without your consent to commit fraud or other crimes.

Personal information includes things like your name and your Social Security, Medicare, or credit card numbers.

Guard your card and protect your personal information

  • To help protect your identity, Medicare is mailing new Medicare cards. Your new card will have a new Medicare Number that’s unique to you, instead of your Social Security Number.
  • Don’t share your Medicare Number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by phone, email, or by approaching you in person, unless you’ve given them permission in advance.
  • Medicare, or someone representing Medicare, will only call and ask for personal information in these situations:
    1. A Medicare health or drug plan can call you if you’re already a member of the plan. The agent who helped you join can also call you.
    2. A customer service representative from 1-800-MEDICARE can call you if you’ve called and left a message or a representative said that someone would call you back.
  • Only give personal information like your Medicare Number to doctors, insurers acting on your behalf, or trusted people in the community who work with Medicare like your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).
  • Be familiar with how Medicare uses your personal information. If you join a Medicare plan, the plan will let you know how it will use your personal information.

If someone calls you and asks for your Medicare Number or other personal information, hang up and call us at 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).

If you suspect identity theft or feel like you gave your personal information to someone you shouldn’t have, contact the Federal Trade Commission.

Help fight Medicare fraud

Medicare fraud wastes a lot of money each year and results in higher health care costs and taxes for everyone. There are con artists who may try to get your Medicare Number or personal information so they can steal your identity and commit Medicare fraud.

Guard your Medicare card like it’s a credit card. Give your Medicare Number only to people you know should have it. Medicare, or someone representing Medicare, will never contact you for your Medicare Number or other personal information unless you’ve given them permission in advance. Learn more about the limited situations in which Medicare can call you.

New Medicare cards

To help protect against identity theft, Medicare has mailed new Medicare cards to people with Medicare. Your new card has a new Medicare Number that’s unique to you, instead of your Social Security Number.

Spot and report Medicare billing fraud

Protect yourself and Medicare against fraud by reviewing your Medicare claims for errors, looking for other types of fraud, and reporting anything suspicious to Medicare.

Protect yourself, your loved ones, and Medicare from fraud

Your Medicare rights

No matter how you get your Medicare, you have certain rights and protections designed to:

  • Protect you when you get health care.
  • Make sure you get the health care services that the law says you can get.
  • Protect you against unethical practices.
  • Protect your privacy.

Details about your rights in Medicare

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Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends

Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trend

One consistent finding for the last several years of reports has been that buyers 37 years and younger (Millennials/Gen Yers) is the largest share of home buyers at 36 percent. Sixty-five percent of these buyers were also first-time home buyers. The largest cohort in America is growing up and becoming more traditional in their buying habits. This year’s report saw an increased share who purchased in suburban locations and who purchased detached single family homes.

Continue reading “Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends”

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That’s not your neighbor calling

Scammers count on it.

 
When your phone rings and it looks like a local call, you may be more likely to answer. Scammers count on this and can easily fake caller ID numbers. They even can match the first six digits of your own number, which is called “neighbor spoofing.” The urge to answer can be tough to resist since you might worry it’s a neighbor who needs help or the school nurse. If you see a number like this on your caller ID, remember that it could be faked. Letting it go to voicemail is one option. If you do pick up and don’t recognize the caller — hang up.

Continue reading “That’s not your neighbor calling”

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How to Find Missing Money.

How to find missing money.

Everyone gets junk mail and if you’re like me you don’t even open most or all of it. I got one letter that caught my eye so I opened it and it was from a company that claimed I had money that was owed to me if my name was

Continue reading “How to Find Missing Money.”

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“Patriot Checks” program True or False?

True or False?

pepi-stojanovski-509192-unsplashThere seems to be a lot of emails and the third rate so call “news services” reporting that you can get money under the “Patriot Checks” program. Cash for Patriots is a federal program described by Zachary Scheidt, an affiliate of the financial publisher Agora Financial. The Cash for Patriots program described in the pitch does not appear to exist, and investors should not pay for these publications unless far more verifiable details are offered. No record of any such program could be found in mainstream news reports, editorials, or press releases, aside from those written by Scheidt himself. The $2.6 trillion figure mentioned in Scheidt’s claims contains a kernel of truth – it’s the amount American companies are estimated to have stored in overseas accounts to save on taxes, and the federal government has stated a desire to investigate these companies and tax them fairly – but this is nothing like the direct payment program that the pitch describes.
 
It’s not clear if the management of Agora Financial is supportive of Scheidt’s pitch, or if it is entirely his own work. The program is never mentioned on Agora’s website, but it is described in some of Scheidt’s articles published on the Daily Reckoning. Agora Financial’s management ought to investigate Scheidt’s pitch since it appears to be explicitly fraudulent and risks damaging the company’s reputation. Nonetheless, investors have nothing to risk by subscribing to Agora Financial’s free newsletters or social media pages, and some of the service’s paid subscriptions are still very reputable.
The old adage still holds true: ‘If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is’ isn’t”.

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/612-credit-for-deserving-americans/

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